December 6, 2015

PREGNANCY BACK PAIN!

If you're feeling aching in your back, you can probably blame your growing uterus and hormonal changes. Your expanding uterus shifts your center of gravity and stretches out and weakens your abdominal muscles, changing your posture and putting a strain on your back. The extra weight you're carrying means more work for your muscles and increased stress on your joints, which is why your back may feel worse at the end of the day. Your growing uterus may also cause back pain if it's pressing on a nerve.
In addition
, hormonal changes in pregnancy loosen your joints and the ligaments that attach your pelvic bones to your spine. This can make you feel less stable and cause pain when you walk, stand, sit for long periods, roll over in bed, get out of a low chair or the tub, bend, or lift things.
What can I do to avoid back pain?
Start an exercise program to stretch and strengthen muscles that support the back and legs, including your abdominal muscles. Be careful to stretch gently because stretching too quickly or too much can put further strain on your joints, which have been made looser by pregnancy. 
Swimming is a great exercise option for pregnant women. It strengthens your abdominal and lower back muscles, and the buoyancy of the water takes the strain off your joints and ligaments.
Stand up straight. This gets harder to do as your body changes, but try to keep your bottom tucked in and your shoulders parallel with your ears. Pregnant women tend to slump their shoulders and arch their backs as their bellies grow, which puts more strain on the spine.
If you sit all day, be sure to sit up straight. Supporting your feet with a footstool can help prevent lumbar pain, as can using a small pillow called a lumbar roll behind your lower back. Take frequent breaks from sitting. Get up and walk around at least every hour or so.
It's equally important to avoid standing for too long. If you need to stand all day, try to take a midday break and rest lying on your side while supporting your upper leg and abdomen with pillows.
Take care when getting out of bed: Bend your legs at your knees and hips when you roll to the side, and use your arms to push yourself up as you dangle your lower legs over the side of the bed.
When should I call my midwife or doctor?
Let your caregiver know if you're suffering from back pain. Call him or her immediately if:
Your back pain is severe; you notice that you've lost feeling in your legs, buttocks, groin, genital area, bladder, or anus; or you suddenly feel uncoordinated or weak. Your caregiver will refer you to a specialist if there's any sign of a neurological problem or any underlying condition. He or she may also prescribe painkillers.
You have low back pain in the late second or third trimester. This can be a sign of preterm labor, particularly if you haven't had back pain before that.
You have pain in your lower back or in your side just under your ribs, on one or both sides. This can be a sign of a kidney infection, especially if you have a fever, nausea, or blood in your urine.

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